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Andrey Rumyantsev

What CMS do you use for your website?

Asked October 15, 2012 by in Web

Free or commercial? What exactly?

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32 Answers

4

Charles Sandor

Charles Sandor October 15, 2012

WordPress is great because it is easy for my clients to learn the basic's when i do dashboard training with them.

However if the required website is fairly robust, then I go with Joomla.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 16, 2012 Thank you, Charles. I like WP. Joomla administration console isn't really user-friendly.

4

Mason Estep

Mason Estep October 16, 2012, Edited November 28, 2012

I know Wordpress is the popular response, but our site used Moto CMS, a flash-based system, and our website looks beautiful. I couldn't be more pleased. And if you're willing to spend a few nights learning basic code to enable Google to pull data off of your flash based site, you'll have a much better looking site than one that's Wordpress based.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 17, 2012 Flash can be beautiful, but it slows down your system. Most of flash-based sites have crazy navigation (like famous brands of watches, for example). It's really hard to find what do you exactly need. We create flash-sites for promoactions only. For corporate sites, business sites it's much more interesting to use HTML5 as it is SEO-friendly and also really beautiful. You can see some animation examples here: http://diafan.7version.com - that is a internet shop we've created for russian customer.
Casey Hill Casey Hill October 24, 2012 Andrey, I believe Mason was talking about the actual CMS, which has nothing to do with your web site itself. I currently am part of a team that has built a Flex-based CMS, so I know the subject matter. So the Moto CMS product is Flash-based, and it most likely creates templates and files that are the normal HTML, CSS, JavaScript. Hope that clears some things up.
Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 25, 2012 Casey, it's clear now about Moto CMS. I'll check it out :-)

3

Nexxus Management

Nexxus Management October 15, 2012

We have had great success with WordPress. The backend is relatively user-friendly for folks who have had minimal exposure to web development, which is a huge plus. The downside is that the templates can be limiting.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 16, 2012 Thank you, Nexxus representative. I like WP too.
Charles Sandor Charles Sandor October 16, 2012 Hi Nexxus, I found out the big mistake was trying to keep my clients costs down by using free templates. Many have poorly written code and no support.. I now always use premium templates with valid code. I have rarely had issues with them and when i have, the tech support has been great.
Kera McHugh Kera McHugh October 16, 2012 many of the free templates are out of date, but so are many premium ones... i make a habit of simply building heavily customized child themes on top of a few defaults & frameworks. I find many premium themes can actually be MORE restrictive as they have so much built in stuff... i prefer to work with 2010 or 2011 and expand from there. you can get quite far away from the original aesthetic while still maintaining stable functionality. U can get exactly what you want, without the stuff you don't want.

3

Jason Hamilton-Mascioli

Jason Hamilton-Mascioli October 15, 2012

Wordpress seems to be the most popular but do like concrete5

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 16, 2012 Thanks a lot, Jason! I've never heard about concrete5 and will check out its features.

3

Kera McHugh

Kera McHugh October 16, 2012

wordpress... simple, well supported, as robust as you need it to be, premium plugins can do pretty much anything you need, there are 1000's of developers available for hire if you need something that doesn't exist, and updating is EASY.

Biggest reason i use it is that it's the simplest one for non-technical users (eg. clients) to learn & feel confident with. I don't work with huge corporate clients, so it fits all my needs.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 17, 2012 Thank you, Kera! The main problem of WP is a possibility for hackers to find one hole and inject billions of sites worldwide :) But it's true for all popular systems.

3

Randy Aimone

Randy Aimone October 16, 2012

Depends: quick Flowchart here:
Are you on a severe budget: Y- Wordpress
N- Do you have budget or time for an in-house developer, or over a 75k/year development expense allocated?
Y- Drupal or Joomla are interchangeable, good but need a professional programmer/web guru at least assisting with the management and maintenance of the site. Anyone who tells you differently is a Drupal or Joomla developer hoping you are going to finance their third Mercedes, or will leave you with a half-broken, un-updateable site.
N- Check out Hubspot- does hosting and has a 24 hour US based Tech support team, does all the backend updates for you, and the software is designed to help you put together an effective selling web site. True- it's not the most advanced CMS- but it works and you just said you don't have the budget for un-essencial fancy. And you'll save in Asprin with all the tools built in.

I've seen about 20 other CMSes through various clients and consulting projects... None worth mentioning specifically as being a better value until you have a web marketing budget of over 150k/year.
Even then, I'd spend 40k a year on a marketing/company journalist before I invested in a next tier marketing system.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 17, 2012 Thank you for your detailed reply, Randy! You can contact me directly and my managers can make a free audit of your sites. We can propose some ways to grow traffic.

2

Mike Mitchell

Mike Mitchell October 15, 2012

If you want Windows centric DotNetNuke, community edition is fine for most sites, add on modules let you complete what it does not have.

For the most scalabilty and flexibility, check out Xwiki.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 15, 2012 Mike, thanks a lot for your reply! As for me, it seems that DotNetNuke has some problems with speed. It works slow when the site contains more than 10 articles :-) XWiki seems to be very simple. Wordpress looks much better and can be customized easily.

2

Matt Meeks

Matt Meeks October 15, 2012

I like WordPress as well, but it depends on the necessary functionality of your site. I develop sites for clients in both WordPress and ExpressionEngine, depending on the needs of the client.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 16, 2012 Thank you, Matt! I like WP and I've never heard about ExpressionEngine. I'll get in touch with it :)

2

Steve Fitzpatrick

Steve Fitzpatrick October 15, 2012

We use wordpress on all of our sites.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 16, 2012 Thank you, Steve!

2

Ryan Van Wagoner

Ryan Van Wagoner October 16, 2012

Kentico. It works, but it's not the most user-friendly for non-technical folks like me.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 17, 2012 Thank you, Ryan, Kentico is a good choise.
Jason Palmer Jason Palmer December 21, 2012 kentico is awesome

2

Sarah Schumacher

Sarah Schumacher October 16, 2012

Self-hosted Wordpress.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 17, 2012 Thanks a lot, Sarah.

2

Sunita Biddu

Sunita Biddu October 16, 2012

Wordpress is handy, seo-friendly and plugin-rich... When it comes to high end sites and security, joomla and drupal is preferred though. I'd stick to wordpress. It keeps me independent.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 17, 2012 Thank you, Sunita! Wordpress is good enough for small business as a starting CMS.

1

John Flanagan

John Flanagan October 15, 2012

Hi Andrey,

Our SiteCaddy service is a full featured CMS, but it also includes e-commerce, CRM, messaging, surveys, and more. Feel free to check it out at SiteCaddy.com, or get in touch if you would like more information.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 16, 2012 Hi, John! I've checked SiteCaddy. If you want I can review your HTML code, it can be optimised a lot. There are some problems with dropdown menus, links positions and some others.

1

Colin Weir

Colin Weir October 15, 2012

Drupal has been great to get us up and running fast

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 16, 2012 Thank you, Colin. It's great, I agree :)

1

Shaunvir Singh

Shaunvir Singh October 16, 2012

It depends on your choice. If you want to go with Window based technology you may choose .NETnuke. Apart from that many open source software are available to develop a site like Wordpress, Drupal or Joomla. Every technology has its own unique features.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 16, 2012 Thank you for your reply, Shaunvir!
Randy Aimone Randy Aimone October 16, 2012 I've yet to see someone who used .NETnuke who didn't later .nuke their site and start over.

1

Debbie Bates-Schrott

Debbie Bates-Schrott October 16, 2012

I would for sure consider WordPress or Drupal. They are both great but depending on how complex your site is or how much integration you need into other databases, my preference is Wordpress. It is much easier to use.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 17, 2012 Thank you, Debbie. As my 9 years IT-experience tells me - you have to create custom CMS for any serious project.

1

Donna Caissie

Donna Caissie October 16, 2012

WordPress self-hosted version. It's free with most web hosting accounts.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 17, 2012 Thank you, Donna!

1

Dino Eliadis

Dino Eliadis October 16, 2012

WordPress on a Genesis Theme for our blog http://yoursmallbusinessgrowth.com

And WordPress on DIY Thesis for website http://dinoeliadis.net

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 17, 2012 Thank you, Dino! Your sites seems to be OK :)

1

Andrea Palten

Andrea Palten October 16, 2012

Hubspot and Wordpress - a mix of both

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 17, 2012 Thank you, Andrea!

1

Adam Szuster

Adam Szuster October 17, 2012

I use Joomla for two of my sites. The third is an old legacy site that I built in html several years ago. Never again! That site will be redone early next year in Joomla.

I pay a developer to build the site in the format and layout I want. I then update content.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 17, 2012 Thank you, Adam. In my opinion Joomla isn't user friendly; admin interface is extremely bad.

1

Paul Maplesden

Paul Maplesden October 17, 2012

Wordpress is quick and (relatively) easy to get up and running, but it all depends on the choices that you make on your plugins and theme.

I use a self-hosted Wordpress install with the excellent Suffusion theme (it's free and easily customisable). There are also some really excellent plugins out there to help with key areas; recommended ones would be 'Better WP Security', 'WordPress SEO' by Yoast, which is superb and W3 Total Cache, which can speed up the responsiveness of your site.

My WordPress blog is here, and is built entirely with a Suffusion customised theme and free plugins. The entire design, together with tweaking, took around 3-4 days to put together.

www.BusinessBulletpoints.com

Hope this helps.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 17, 2012 Thank you, Paul. You're sites look quite good.

1

William Cobbett

William Cobbett October 17, 2012

We use Wordpress - free, stable, feature-rich, easy to use and plenty of resources available to help (both free & paid).

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 17, 2012 Thank you, William! Let your business grow :)

1

David Pope

David Pope October 17, 2012, Edited October 23, 2012

Wordpress changed my life from being a frustrated jack-programmer to a content creative. A bit like an old Dos PC to a new Mac.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 17, 2012 David, that seems to be a cool story :) Thank you.

1

Darryl Freeman

Darryl Freeman October 19, 2012

I used to love WP but I have been using TextPattern for 6 months. It is great for my needs.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 24, 2012 Thank you, Darryl!

0

Guido De Gols

Guido De Gols November 6, 2012

I used to have both Wordpress and Typo3 (2 different sites 2 different audiences).

Wordpress is very popular. But popular does not mean top notch. It depends on what you want to do with it. Blogging near perfection, but a CMS needs to be able to do a lot more than a blog. One day they might get there.

Typo3: german technology. strong and disciplined, but maybe too much engineered.

Then I ran into Concrete 5. WISIWYG editing, simple, decent logins, blogs, frames that link into other sites, add-ons that work and do what they are supposed to do....

Kicking out all the rest and converting.

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0

Sarah Johs

Sarah Johs October 30, 2012

Wordpress

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0

Bryan Owens

Bryan Owens 4 months ago

We use WordPress for all of our sites.

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0

Deniz Arslan

Deniz Arslan December 3, 2012

Always opt first for free CMS: Joomla / WordPress - or when building an online store I recommend OpenCart. Joomla gives you more freedom to add heavy components for your specific purposes.

I would not recommend a Flash based CMS.

Always make a responsive website though

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0

Nizamudheen Valliyattu

Nizamudheen Valliyattu November 24, 2012

Wordpress.. easy to handle,customize, SEO. also using magento,opencart for ecommerce.

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0

Chris Williams

Chris Williams October 16, 2012

wordpress

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 17, 2012 Thank you, Chris!

0

Ronald Kyamagero

Ronald Kyamagero November 26, 2012

I wouldn't even want to think on this one. WORDPRESS!!! It is easy for clients to learn and use yet robust enough.

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0

Jan Kiermasz

Jan Kiermasz October 26, 2012, Edited October 26, 2012

Mostly we use Wordpress. Google likes wordpress sites too which is an added advantage. It's probably the most popular answer answer because of ease of use combined with lots of support.

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Andrey Rumyantsev Andrey Rumyantsev October 29, 2012 Jan, I totally agree with you :)